SOLID STATE RELAY

Description

  • Phototriac isolation
  • 2A at 100 to 240V AC rated output load
  • 5V control signal
  • LED indicator
  • Screw terminals
  • Easy to use and set up

2 amp, 100 to 240 VAC solid state relay with a 5 volt control signal input on a breakout board with indicator LED and sinking transistor input.

Remotely turn on your regular household items with a timer, in response to a sensor, via Bluetooth, with a PIN code… There are many possibilities for this component. Be careful: 220 AC mains are dangerous if not handled with care!

Input control signal voltage +5 VDC 20 mA
Rated output load 2 A at 100 to 240 VAC
Operating and release time 1/2 of load power source cycle + 1 ms max.
Output ON voltage drop 1.60 V (RMS) max.
Insulation resistance 1,000 M Ohms min. at 500 VDC
Operating temperature -30° to 80°C (-22° to 176°F) with no icing or condensation

Easy to connect, with only three cables. You can screw one end of the male to male jumper cables to the SSR board screw terminals and connect the module directly to the Arduino compatible board.

To supply voltage to the board, connect the +5v pin to the DC+ screw terminal and the GND pin to the DC- screw terminal. Connect the control signal CH1 to any digital output. For our example, connect CH1 to digital 3 of your Arduino-compatible board.

Interrupt one pole of your load and connect it in and out of the screw terminals (SW1) on your load side of the SSR. The relay acts as a regular switch on any lamp interrupting one of the lines that goes to mains.

IMPORTANT NOTICE

Be very careful when handling mains and always check that everything you are handling is unplugged! Once you are ready, check for shorts and bad connections, and make sure that everything is properly screwed in and insulated. Only once you are sure everything is ok, plug in your Arduino-compatible board (use the power supply – do not use your computer’s USB port) and finally connect your device to mains. Don’t use devices that consume more than 2 amps.

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/*Rewieved by Dr. Mangus for MangoLabs
  Blink SSR
  Turns on the SSR on for one second, then off for thre second, repeatedly.
  
  This example code is in the public domain.
  
 based on sketch by Scott Fitzgerald
 */
  
  
// the setup function runs once when you press reset or power the board
void setup() {
  // initialize digital outputs.
  pinMode(13, OUTPUT);
  pinMode(3, OUTPUT);
}
  
// the loop function runs over and over again forever
void loop() {
  digitalWrite(13, HIGH);   // turn the LED on (HIGH is the voltage level
  digitalWrite(3, LOW);     // turn the SSR on (because the input uses a sinking transistor logic is inverted))
  delay(1000);              // wait for a second
  digitalWrite(13, LOW);    // turn the LED off by making the voltage LOW
  digitalWrite(3, HIGH);   // turn the SSR Off
  delay(3000);              // wait for three second
}
  1. In this example we are connecting:
    Arduino    SSR board
    D3      —    CH1
    GND  —    DC-
    5V      —    DC+
  2. Connect one pole of your load into one terminal of SW (B1) and out of the other terminal of SW1 (A1) to one pole of mains. Connect the other pole of your load directly to the other pole of mains.
  3. Download and install the Arduino environment from here or use the web editor.
  4. Download the sketch here and open or open the Arduino environment and copy the code into a blank sketch.
  5. Connect your board to your computer with the included USB cable.
  6. Select your board in Tools / Board / Arduino Uno.
  7. Select your port in Tools / Port / COM# (Arduino Uno). This may be slightly different depending on your operating system.
  8. Upload by pressing the arrow in the circle to the upper left.
  9. Unplug the Arduino-compatible board from the computer and use the power supply included in the kit.
  10. IMPORTANT NOTICE
    Be very careful when handling mains and always check that everything you are handling is unplugged! Once you are ready, check for shorts and bad connections, and make sure that everything is properly screwed in and insulated. Only once you are sure everything is ok, plug in your Arduino-compatible board (use the power supply – do not use your computer’s USB port) and finally connect your device to mains. Don’t use devices that consume more than 2 amps.
  11. You should see the SSR board LED blink simultaneously with the pin 13 LED of the Arduino-compatible board. If you have a connected load, it should also turn on and off. Remember to connect a load that consumes less than 2 amps. Be very careful and always unplug everything while you are connecting your terminals!
    That’s it!