STEPPER DRIVER MODULE

Description

  • Stepper driver module for use with any microcontroller
  • Compatible with several types of logic
  • Supports voltages up to 50V
  • Output clamp diodes
  • Up to 500 mA per channel
  • Two included in the kit
  • Easy to use and set up

The stepper driver module is easy to use and set up. The driver and stepper motor connectors are compatible and keyed, so you won’t have to measure, search and test endlessly to connect the stepper motor to the driver. LEDs on the driver give you good visual feedback on the operation and sequence of your channels to help you debug your code. The driver is 5 to 12 compatible, and with the included 12V 3A power supply you will be able to drive plenty of steppers!

Supply voltage +5 to +12 VDC (IC is 30 VDC capable)
Peak collector current 500 mA
Clamp diode reverse voltage 50V
Logic input 2.7-k Ohms series base resistor for each Darlington pair for operation directly with TTL or 5-V CMOS devices
Input protection Each input has a Zener diode and resistor in series to control the input current to a safe limit
IC ULN2003A with seven
NPN Darlington pairs featuring high-voltage
outputs with common-cathode clamp diodes for
switching inductive loads
Operating temperature -20 to 70 ℃

Easy to connect, with only four signal cables plus power. With the keyed, stepper motor connector, connecting the motor to the driver is a breeze.

Use the male to female jumper cables to connect the module directly to the Arduino-compatible board. If you are powering the Arduino from the 12V power supply you can connect the ground of the driver module to the GND of the Arduino-compatible board, and the supply to the Vin of the Arduino compatible board. (You could use also the 5V from the on-board regulator, although we discourage it because of the high current draw of the stepper.)

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// Rewieved by Dr. Mangus for Mango Labs
//
// Make a single stepper bounce from one limit to another
//
// Copyright (C) 2012 Mike McCauley
// $Id: Random.pde,v 1.1 2011/01/05 01:51:01 mikem Exp mikem $
 
#include <AccelStepper.h>
 
// Define a stepper and the pins it will use
AccelStepper stepper(AccelStepper::FULL4WIRE, 2, 4, 3, 5);
 
void setup()
  // Change these to suit your stepper if you want
  stepper.setMaxSpeed(300);
  stepper.setAcceleration(50);
  stepper.moveTo(1000);
}
 
void loop()
{
    // If at the end of travel go to the other end
    if (stepper.distanceToGo() == 0)
      stepper.moveTo(-stepper.currentPosition());
 
    stepper.run();
}
  1. In this example we are connecting:
    Arduino    Stepper Driver
    D2     —– IN1
    D3     —– IN2
    D4     —– IN3
    D5     —– IN4
    GND —–  –
    Vin    —– +
  2. Connect the stepper motor to the stepper driver. The header is keyed so you won’t get it wrong.
  3. Download and install the Arduino environment from here or use the web editor.
  4. To power your Arduino with the included power supply, connect the barrel connector to the board.
  5. Download the Arduino libraries here.
  6. Unzip and paste the folder in the Arduino libraries folder. It’s in the same location as your default sketches. To find the sketchbook location, go to File / Preferences.
  7. Download the sketch here and open, or open the Arduino environment and copy the code into a blank sketch.
  8. Select your board in Tools / Board / Arduino Uno.
  9. Select your port in Tools / Port / COM# (Arduino Uno). This may be slightly different depending on your operating system.
  10. Upload by pressing the arrow in the circle to the upper left.
  11. If everything is OK the stepper motor should turn to one side and then bounce back, repeatedly.